By Ana Arieza, Shafi Ahsan and Romeris Rosario, Panther Academy
We are PANTHER Academy students. We have
RecordedData
measured the paral ax angle and directly have
measured the distance for each object and have
recorded the data in a table Then, we graph
the data, plotting paral ax angle as a function
of distance.
We have analyzed the graph and have determined
an approximate functional dependence for paral ax
with distance. Then, based on studying trigonometry,
Distance Paral axAngle
we have plot diagrams of the paral ax measurements;
(ft)
(degree)
and we have used trigonometry to derive what the
actual functional dependence is:
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b=baseline,p=paral axangle,d=distance
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56
tan(p/2)=(b/2)/d
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30
p=2tan-1(b/2d)
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20
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161
We have plot this function on the same graph as
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9.5
our data and have compared our measurements
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8.5
with the theoretical prediction from geometry.
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76
We know for this to work properly, the reference
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point used in the paral ax.
Measurements must be far away and exhibit little
paral ax itself. Otherwise, the data wil be
systematical y skewed to lower paral ax values.
One way to do this is to place reference targets
on the far wal of the classroom and space them
apart the Same length as the baseline we are using.
When we are on one side of the baseline, we line
up with the reference target on the same side of the
target object (see figure).
It is important to line up the eye arrow with the
reference object or target object arrow plus the
objects ourselves when making our measurements.
To do this, we kept the angle measurer fixed in
place but move our eye to line up the arrows with
the targets. If we do not move our eye, we wil
get paral ax values systematical y skewed to
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higher values.